Alan Harnum

Netsweeper at Toronto Public Library - Waiting on An Answer

Proposed thought experiment (forgive me if this is too trolley problem): let us suppose a company's product is portable paper incinerators. — Alan Harnum (@waharnum) September 23, 2016 Update On September 29th I received an official reply from Toronto Public Library with the following: Netsweeper is used for filtering on children’s public access computers (“pornography” and “criminal information” categories). Netsweeper is also used for blocking access to all sites aside from the library web page on computers designated as public access catalogues Netsweeper has been used at the library for around 10 years Introduction Last week stories began to circulate in the media (here’s one from the Toronto Star) based on a report by the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab that Canadian tech company Netsweeper’s filtering solution was being used in Bahrain to censor websites, “including content relating to human rights, oppositional political websites, Shiite websites, local and regional news sources, and content critical of religion”. Read more...

Unsolicited Technical Advice for Toronto Public Library From Someone Who Used to Work There

Introductory Remarks Bianca Wylie published a recent article on Torontoist about the problems with procurement practices in government technology. I had this to say when I retweeted the article: I saw all of the issues here up close during the 6 years I worked in tech for Toronto Public Library. https://t.co/RZKNqMJz6X — Alan Harnum (@waharnum) September 3, 2016 It goes without saying that my perceptions of the strengths and deficiencies of how libraries deploy and manage technology was shaped most specifically by the ten years I worked at Toronto Public Library, six of them with the library’s web services group. Read more...

Library Voices - A Mashup of TPL's Live Search Feed with Voice Synthesis

A recent fun hack project of mine is Library Voices, which streams the live search feed that powers Toronto Public Library’s search dashboard to a random available speech synthesis voice from the Web Speech API. When I posted the project on Facebook, a library friend of mine asked about potential privacy issues of library’s the feed and whether I had any thoughts about that. I figured I’d post my response here more publicly: Read more...

Joseph Bloorg Gets a Publication Credit

I’m pleased to report that another poetic collaboration between myself and semi-famed Twitter bot / poet Joseph Bloorg has garnered a publication credit from Unlost, a journal for found poetry. It is reproduced below, but if you have any interest in found poetry I recommend checking out Unlost, which publishes a lot of interesting poems in the genre. As Boys and Girls Settled Down With Armouries 1. Waiting for the Races “Kill as you go” former street chess wizard Read more...

My Site Now Includes User Interface Options

A quick note to say that I have implemented User Interface Options as part of this site, one of the projects we work on at the Inclusive Design Research Centre. It can be accessed through the “Show Display Preferences” tab in the upper right. The framework of the research community I am part of is best articulated by the Three Dimensions of Inclusive Design. To quote a part of that that I think particularly applies to UI Options: Read more...

Toronto Poetry Map Code Open Sourced

I’m pleased to be able to announce for National Poetry Month 2016 that I’ve worked with my former colleagues at Toronto Public Library to release the code that runs the Toronto Poetry Map launched around this time last year under an open source license for anyone interested in studying the code or using it in their own projects. I was part of the team that worked on the map and had hoped from the start we’d be able to open source the code, so it’s nice a year later to be able to announce the open source release. Read more...

*.inlibraries.com

Since Access 2015 I have owned the inlibraries.com domain after a lot of joking with other attendees there about a Certain Kind of Library Discourse™. I have now built a full-on fake library conference generator using Python’s Flask framework and hosted it at the domain, allowing for endless (or at least a limited amount of) merriment as you browse conferences such as: http://dogs_with_tiny_hats.inlibraries.com/ http://the_robot_annihilation_of_humanity.inlibraries.com/ http://buzzwords.inlibraries.com/ The magic of inlibraries. Read more...

The Journals of Joseph Bloorg

If you’re uninterested in background you can simply skip to the poems I made from the tweets of a bot. Preamble The Joseph Bloorg Twitter bot that tweets random items from TPL’s digital collections has been live for about three months now. Bloorg himself isn’t a very complex bot - he just tweets a random item and the text of his tweet (minus the link) is the item’s title as recorded in the item metadata. Read more...

The Annonated Joseph Bloorg (or, How To Use an RSS Feed as an API)

Background Last weekend, I mentored at Toronto Public Library’s first Hackathon. It’s the first significant thing I’ve done with the library since I stopped working there in June, and while not exactly odd to go back in this way, it’s also clear I still haven’t transitioned to being “outside” the library (I caught myself again and again saying “we” in reference to TPL or the library world in general when discussing why something was the way it was / worked the way it did). Read more...

Speech to 2015 Master of Incusive Design Intensive

In June 2015, I left Toronto Public Library after nearly ten years there to take a position as a Senior Inclusive Developer at the Inclusive Design Research Centre at OCAD University. In July, I was invited by Jutta Treviranus to talk to the students of the Master of Inclusive Design program during their two-week summer intensive about “something I was passionate about”. I chose libraries. These are my speaking notes, with occasional inline commentary. Read more...